Reading at the Ryga Festival, 1 pm August 30, 2018

Today, I’m off to Summerland to share some words and thoughts at The Ryga Festival. 
Here’s how they put it:

Thursday, August 30

Harold Rhenisch

Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm

Harold Rhenisch reads from his poetry and prose – and talks about his blog – okanaganokanogan.com

Poet, editor, blogger, Harold Rhenisch has written more than twenty books in different media. Born near Cawston, BC, he grew up working in the orchards of the Okanagan and Similkameen valleys, and has drawn lifelong inspiration from his native terroir.

In all his prolific writing, tireless blogs and breathtaking images, Rhenisch has been striving “to create an authentic literature for the silent rural parts of Canada, to place their images and dialects on an equal footing with those of the modern urban world.”

Harold Rhenisch was the 2007 recipient of the annual George Ryga Prize for Social Awareness.

Venue

SUMMERLAND LIBRARY

Event Type: Author Reading
Admission: Free

 

I have put together a slide show, to circle around my poem Saying the Names, and its roots in the land and the work of poets Al Purdy and Pat Lane. There is a story of many of us walking together. This festival is a celebration of the legacy of one of these joined voices, the playwright George Ryga…

George Ryga
Again, here’s how the festival puts the story:

About George Ryga

Writer & Playwright

George Ryga, considered by many as Canada’s most important English language playwright, lived in Summerland from 1963 until his death in 1987.

His prolific multifaceted writings includes stage plays, radio, TV and film scripts, novels, short stories and novellas, critical essays, travelogues, music and song lyrics, and poetry.

Most of Ryga’s creative output originated from his home in Summerland, including The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, which was published to critical acclaim in 1967 and remains the best-selling Canadian play of all time.

Born in 1932, Ryga was raised poor in the Ukrainian farming community near the town of Athabasca. Despite having to leave school at the age of 13, he soon won a scholarship to the prestigious Banff School of Fine Arts on the strength of one of his very first stories.

George Ryga first found national fame when CBC television produced his play Indian, and soon two of his novels were published in England. In 1963 he and his wife Norma brought their young family to Summerland, where they bought a small orchard on Caldwell Street. It was here that Ryga came to write his most famous works, including The Ecstasy of Rita Joe (1967), which awakened a nation celebrating its centennial to the continuing tragedy of its Indigenous Peoples. Two years later the play was revived to open the new National Arts Centre in Ottawa, an event attended by the prime minister and all ten provincial premiers. As the late great director John Juliani wrote, George Ryga should be remembered and celebrated for “bringing the contemporary age to the Canadian stage.”

I will be talking about one place where all of this comes together, the heart of the Plateau, Palouse Falls:

Since before its first occupation 8,000 years ago, this has been a living human space. We serve ourselves well to enter it. I hope to see you in Summerland!

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